Vajracakra

The Forum For Traditional Vajrayāna
It is currently Sat Nov 18, 2017 5:29 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2014 9:26 pm
Posts: 308
Thomas Amundsen wrote:
Adi wrote:
Absolutely. I've heard so many Lamas advise students not to be sloppy, to focus attention on the details. And to consider our ideas about what is important, what is not, in details, and the assumptions people hold that prevent them from maturing. My favorite example of this is the late Thinley Norbu Rinpoche's instructions on vacuuming the carpet in the shrine room.

Can you post more on this? Or point to where I might be able to read this story? :anjali


I will tell you as best I can as I heard it from Thinley Norbu's students.

A while ago when he was having shrine rooms constructed and set up, he really made it a point to get students to see that everything in the room was an offering. Not just the things in the bowls, serkyems, etc., but also the entirety of the room, including what people were wearing and doing. To really break down the walls between what is "special" and "ordinary" in student's thinking. To really be aware and mindful of absolutely everything a person was doing in the room. This went to vacuuming the carpets which were not to be done in a thoughtless, sloppy manner but rather in a mindfully elegant one. The carpets were vacuumed so that perfect, pleasing patterns were left by the vacuum instead of random lines. Meticulous isn't quite the right word as one can do every little detail without much thought, but a kind of mindful awareness that everything one does is an offering, a practice, something to not sleepwalk through.

I am told one of the highest compliments he would pay those students would be to tell them they could vacuum the shrine room. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 5:16 pm
Posts: 428
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Adi wrote:
Thomas Amundsen wrote:
Adi wrote:
Absolutely. I've heard so many Lamas advise students not to be sloppy, to focus attention on the details. And to consider our ideas about what is important, what is not, in details, and the assumptions people hold that prevent them from maturing. My favorite example of this is the late Thinley Norbu Rinpoche's instructions on vacuuming the carpet in the shrine room.

Can you post more on this? Or point to where I might be able to read this story? :anjali


I will tell you as best I can as I heard it from Thinley Norbu's students.

A while ago when he was having shrine rooms constructed and set up, he really made it a point to get students to see that everything in the room was an offering. Not just the things in the bowls, serkyems, etc., but also the entirety of the room, including what people were wearing and doing. To really break down the walls between what is "special" and "ordinary" in student's thinking. To really be aware and mindful of absolutely everything a person was doing in the room. This went to vacuuming the carpets which were not to be done in a thoughtless, sloppy manner but rather in a mindfully elegant one. The carpets were vacuumed so that perfect, pleasing patterns were left by the vacuum instead of random lines. Meticulous isn't quite the right word as one can do every little detail without much thought, but a kind of mindful awareness that everything one does is an offering, a practice, something to not sleepwalk through.

I am told one of the highest compliments he would pay those students would be to tell them they could vacuum the shrine room. :)

Thank you :anjali


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 10:39 pm
Posts: 2008
Adi wrote:
I will tell you as best I can as I heard it from Thinley Norbu's students.

A while ago when he was having shrine rooms constructed and set up, he really made it a point to get students to see that everything in the room was an offering. Not just the things in the bowls, serkyems, etc., but also the entirety of the room, including what people were wearing and doing. To really break down the walls between what is "special" and "ordinary" in student's thinking. To really be aware and mindful of absolutely everything a person was doing in the room. This went to vacuuming the carpets which were not to be done in a thoughtless, sloppy manner but rather in a mindfully elegant one. The carpets were vacuumed so that perfect, pleasing patterns were left by the vacuum instead of random lines. Meticulous isn't quite the right word as one can do every little detail without much thought, but a kind of mindful awareness that everything one does is an offering, a practice, something to not sleepwalk through.

I am told one of the highest compliments he would pay those students would be to tell them they could vacuum the shrine room. :)


Maybe that's what the thing with having his students cutting his lawn by hand with scissors was about too. I've always kind of wondered about that.

_________________
Through Dzogchen we can really understand what God is and we don’t have to worry if there is a God or not. God always exists as our real nature, the base, for everybody. - Chögyal Namkhai Norbu


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group